Beauty

Top 10 Benefits of Castor Oil for Black Women

Castor Oil is made by the pressing of the castor seeds (Ricinus Communis), which brings out a pale, yellow, tasteless liquid that has long been used for a variety of reasons. 

This vegetable oil has a history of use so long that it dates back to the Ancient Egyptians, from where it quickly spread across the world to Persia and Europe, eventually finding its way down the silk road to China. 

What’s interesting about learning how the ancients used this oil is the fact that not much has changed in the modern era when it comes to what it is used for.

The ancients used castor oil for industrial applications (such as torches and lamps) as well as medicinal purposes much like we do today but with less complexity of course.

 

What is Castor Oil? 

 

 

Castor oil is a type of vegetable oil that can be used not only on your hair, skin, and nails but also for health related issues like constipation. (1

Castor oil was used by the famous Cleopatra, who used the oil on her eyelashes, eyebrows, and her hair. 

In modern times, castor oil is widely used as an active ingredient in pharmaceuticals, skin-care products, industrial applications, and medicinal industries as well. 

The majority of castor oil’s benefits are derived from its high concentration of unsaturated fatty acids. (2

Although used heavily in cosmetics, soaps, textiles, medicines, and massage oils, castor oil has gained popularity for its natural treatment benefits.

Let’s dive into the benefits and uses of castor oil.

 

Castor Oil for Hair 

We couldn’t have started this list off without mentioning one of the best uses for castor oil, which is castor oil for hair!

 

When it comes to hair, we all have our issues. Castor oil has long been used by the older generation for stimulation of hair growth, improving hair thickness, and relieving dry scalp issues.

 

What’s interesting about the long use of castor oil for hair growth is the fact that no scientific studies have been able to unanimously affirm its benefits for stimulating hair growth. 

 

The belief in castor oil being able to aid in hair growth stems from the ingredients the oil contains such omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin E, and ricinoleic acid just to name a few.

 

Ricinoleic acid has been studied on a hair condition called Acute Hair Felting. (3)

 

What we do know is that castor oil can help moisturize the scalp, ease dandruff, and leave your hair smooth and shiny.

 

Castor oil is rich in omega 3 fatty acid, which has been found to help nourish the follicles of your hair. 

 

The oil has all the right sources of vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, and omega fatty acids to replenish and revitalize your hair and scalp. (4

 

“It is ricinoleic, a monounsaturated fatty acid which can act as humectant and moisturizer,” says Narayana from the Institute of Medical Sciences in India. (5)

It’s antibacterial and antifungal components are a great help against folliculitis (inflammation of hair follicles), dandruff, and even poor scalp health. (6)

 

Castor oil packs another element called ricinoleic acid, which has shown indication to help stimulate hair follicle activity.

The nutrient-dense vitamins and minerals that are packed in this vegetable oil make it a great natural remedy for dandruff as well. 

 

Castor Oil to Grow Hair 

 

 

Research has shown that castor oil can aid in reducing hair loss and helping keep your hair follicles healthy. 

 

Castor oil has all the right sources of vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, and omega fatty acids to help nourish your hair and scalp. 

 

It’s antibacterial and antifungal components enable it to perform well against folliculitis (inflammation of hair follicles), dandruff, and even scalp infection.


Castor oil includes the presence of ricinoleic acid which has been shown to stimulate circulation in the scalp. (10)

 

The antioxidants found in castor oil can also help support the levels of keratin in hair thus helping your hair to become smoother and shinier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Castor Oil Moisturizes Hair

 

The nutrients in Castor oil can help moisturize your hair and impact related problems like itchy scalp and dandruff.

 

The humectants in Castor Oil have been shown to be able to help retain moisture for your hair. (9)

 

Many top hair moisturizers come with a host of chemicals and added ingredients, while castor oil is but a simple natural oil with mostly benefits.

 

How to Use Castor Oil for Moisturizing:

 

  1. Pour the oil into your hands and gently massage it into your scalp for about 10 minutes.
  2. Leave it in for 30 minutes or overnight.
  3. Rinse your hair and wash as you normally do.

 

You can also mix castor oil with any other oil that you might like such as coconut oil, black seed oil, argan oil, and almond oil. 

 

Castor Oil for Beard

 

For all of our male readers, rejoice! Castor oil can help you with your “beard gains.” The healthy levels of fats and vitamins help keep your beard moisturized, smooth, and shiny. 

 

The oil can also help keep your hair follicles healthy and strong as well as provide antibacterial properties to keep away acne. (10)

 

Castor Oil on Eyelashes and Eyebrows 

 

Castor oil can work very well for your eyelashes and eyebrows. The oil contains monounsaturated fatty acids that can promote eyelash and eyebrow growth while also giving your eyelashes and brows a thicker look. 

 

In fact, one study showed that castor oil was able to increase the luster of hair. (11)

 

Castor oil also contains vitamin E which can help in nourishing and keeping your hair follicles healthy. 

 

How to Use Castor Oil for Eyelashes and Eyebrows:

 

  1. Start with cleaning your face and make sure you remove makeup from your eyes.
  2. You can use a clean mascara wand or a clean eyeliner brush to apply the oil.
  3. Apply castor oil on your upper and lower lashline, making sure it is thoroughly coated.
  4. Leave it overnight, and you can remove it in the morning with a makeup wipe or some water.

 

 

castor oil for scalp

 

 

 

Castor Oil for Scalp

 

Castor oil is an intense moisturizer that can also be used as a conditioner. Scalp health can be an issue for anyone regardless of hair type. 

 

Finding products that can nourish the scalp without added chemicals is hard, which makes castor oil an even better candidate for the job. 

 

The unsaturated fats in castor oil are great for lubricating the hair follicles as well as hydrating the hair shafts. 

 

Moisturizing the scalp can help nourish and limit issues such as dry scalp and dandruff. (12)

Jamaican Black Castor Oil 

 

What makes Jamaican black castor oil different than regular castor oil is the way in which the oil is extracted from the seeds. 

 

The process begins with the roasting of the seeds in a rotating mortar and is followed with the pressing of the seeds. Water is added to the compressed seeds and is then boiled–usually on a wood fire. 

 

The resulting oil is a deep dark oil in color which is why it is given the term “Jamaican Black Castor Oil.” 

 

The main difference between common varieties of castor oil and Jamaican black castor oil is that former is processed using commercial equipment while the latter is processed in a more traditional method. 

 

Cold pressed castor oil like the one we offer does not involve heat, while Jamacain black is a result of the burning of the seeds. 

 

Each oil has its set of special benefits depending on what your preferences are and what you will be using the oil for. 

 

When studied side by side both oils have a lot of similarities benefit-wise.   

 

Castor Oil for Skin

 

Castor oil can be great in hydrating and moisturizing the skin. From your face to your body, castor oil has qualities that can help in many areas. 

 

Castor oil has been shown to help reduce acne and inflammation of the skin. (13)

 

Castor oil packs healthy fatty acids that help keep skin feeling vibrant and great. 

 

The unsaturated fatty acids also aid in the process of regeneration on the skin. (14)

 

Castor oil can also help with sunburn as well as assisting in managing the pain. (15)

 

Alleviation of sunburn pain is actually one of the greatest properties of castor oil we have identified when it comes to reducing the effects of sunburn. 

Castor Oil Benefits

This wonderful vegetable oil has many benefits and uses. The added advantage of castor oil is its natural appeal as a healthy alternative to chemical products. 

 

The benefits of castor oil range from skin benefits all the way to using it for lamps and tiki torches. 

 

Castor Oil for Wounds

 

One of the causes of wounds not healing properly is the lack of moisture that can dry out your wound and decrease healing time. 

 

Castor oil can help promote and retain moisture around your wound which can help in the process of healing your wound. (17)  

 

The Vitamin E in castor oil along with healthy fatty acids can help stimulate skin tissue growth. 

 

Castor Oil for Athlete’s Foot


Athlete foot is a fungal infection that most often begins between your toes. Athlete’s foot is common among sweaty feet and tightly fitted shoes.


Athlete’s foot can cause itching, stinging, and burning sensation. It should be known that athletes’ feet are contagious and can be spread via contaminated floors, mats, rugs, towels, and clothing. 

 

A common place that athletes’ feet can spread is in gym locker rooms, where the majority of people are barefoot while changing.


Castor oil can be a natural treatment for an athlete’s foot due to its antifungal component. 

 

It’s also rich in anti-bacterial properties which are also an added advantage when using it to treat an athlete’s foot. (19).

 

Castor oil also aids in relieving the symptoms of irritation, burning, and itching.

 

Castor Oil for Dandruff


Among the other useful benefits of castor oil is how great it can be in dealing with dandruff. 

 

The nutrient-dense oil, packed with vitamins and minerals, helps keep your scalp moisturized and vibrant, reducing dandruff.

 

To use for dandruff, simply rub the oil on your palms and massage into your hair and scalp before sleeping.

 

Castor Oil for Chapped Lips 

 

 

Suffering from chapped lips? Say no more. One of the most relieving castor oil uses utilizes the 

anti-inflammatory effects it has when dealing with dry skin. 

 

Castor oil makes for one of the most effective natural treatments for chapped lips.

 

The monounsaturated fatty acids, as well as Vitamin E, help replenish and restore moisture to your lips. 

 

How to Use Castor Oil for your Lips: 

 

  1. Apply a few drops of castor oil on your lips and massage thoroughly.

 

Side Effects of Castor Oil


Castor oil has been shown to be safe when used in moderation. However, pregnant and lactating women should consult their doctor before using since it’s known to potentially induce labor.

 

If you also suffer from an intestinal blockage, acute inflammatory intestinal disease, appendicitis, or abdominal pain, make sure to reach out to your doctor before using. 

 

Castor oil is a strong laxative and can be discomforting if you’re dealing with other complications.

Overdosage of castor oil may result in diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and cramping. 

 

If you think you’re experiencing the effects of an overdose, make sure to contact a healthcare professional immediately.

 

Key Takeaways

 

While our list only scratched the surface of the capabilities of this oil, it’s worth noting that there are many more castor oil uses that we haven’t mentioned in our list. 

 

Mostly due to the lack of research, we wanted to mention only the most popular and scientifically backed treatments of this wonderful oil.

 

Another important thing to keep in mind is that castor oil is beneficial not only for preventative health care but also as a key component for many household uses. 

 

It also makes a great oil for cooking, however it does burn at a different rate so make sure to know what meal to use it for. 

 

 

 

References

1-Vinay R. Patel, Gerard G. Dumancas https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5015816/ 

2-Joseph Nichols, and Edgar Schipper https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ja01554a033

3-Ramya Maduri, Ahalya Vedachalam https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5596646/

4-https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312591109_Physical_and_Nutrient_Characterisation_of_Raw_and_Processed_Castor_Ricinus_communis_L_Seeds_in_Nigeria

5-Sagiv, Dikstein S, Ingber A. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11301638

10-M. Abdulla Al-Mamun https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4942971/

11-McMullen R https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14528387

12-Nidal Amin Jaradat https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5499037/

13-Swarnlata Saraf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25542985

14-Boddu SH https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3141305/

15-Sage Journals https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10915810701663150

16-Sorin Tunaru https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384204/

17-Ananda A. Dorai https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3495394/

18-Alsaab H https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25542985

19-Zerin Akter https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4942971/

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